Beverages

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5 Books to Read this Month: January 2024

5 Books to Read this Month: January 2024

by David Klemt

Flipping through an open book

Our inspiring and informative January book selections will help you and your team transform your operations and F&B programming.

This month, we look at books covering an array of topics: becoming a great boss; gaining perspective when analyzing your business; and more.

To review the book recommendations from December 2023, click here.

Let’s jump in!

Single AF Cocktails: Drinks for Bad B*tches

You may roll your eyes at the title of this cocktail book but there’s no denying it has your attention. In that way, it’s much like a well-curated, themed cocktail menu split into cleverly named sections. In fact, this book is separated into sections that match its overall theme. For example, Honeymoon Phase, Betrayal, Devastation, and Resilience. If you have reality show fans among your guests, they’ll likely know author Ariana Madix from Vanderpump Rules and Dancing with the Stars. So, they’ll probably dig these drinks.

From Amazon: “The newly solo Ariana serves up her own recipes and perspective in a unique exploration of the stages of a doomed relationship. In her own words, Ariana takes back the narrative of her very public breakup while inspiring others to find inner strength in their own troubles. Each drink tells part of the story from her point of view, from when she first met her ex, through the insidious affair and its painful aftermath, and to her present state, coming out the other side, stronger than before.”

Grab it today!

How to Be a Great Boss

Entrepreneurs, when working with a team, need to be leaders. That means being a great boss. However, that doesn’t mean being a tyrant. If you want to earn buy-in from your team, if you want to get the most out of each person, you need to get them excited and engaged.

From Amazon: “Studies have repeatedly shown that the majority of employees are disengaged at work. But it doesn’t have to be this way. Often, the difference between a group of indifferent employees and a fully engaged team comes down to one simple thing: —a great boss.

“In How to Be a Great Boss, Gino Wickman and René Boer present a straightforward, practical approach to help bosses at all levels of an organization get the most from their people. They share time-tested tools that have worked for more than 30,000 bosses in every industry. You can learn to be a great boss—and dramatically improve both your organization’s performance and your team’s excitement about their work.”

Pick up the hardcover today.

Same as Ever: A Guide to What Never Changes

As a business owner, it’s smart to see what’s changing. However, it’s also crucial to identify what’s not changing to gain perspective and understand the whole picture.

From Amazon: “With his usual elan, Morgan Housel presents a master class on optimizing risk, seizing opportunity, and living your best life. Through a sequence of engaging stories and pithy examples, he shows how we can use our newfound grasp of the unchanging to see around corners, not by squinting harder through the uncertain landscape of the future, but by looking backwards, being more broad-sighted, and focusing instead on what is permanently true.

“By doing so, we may better anticipate the big stuff, and achieve the greatest success, not merely financial comforts, but most importantly, a life well lived.”

Click here for the hardcover, or here for the paperback.

Bar Hacks: Developing The Fundamentals for an Epic Bar

This informative and conversational book written by KRG Hospitality president Doug Radkey is the perfect read for aspiring or seasoned bar, pub, lounge, or even restaurant owners, operators, and managers looking for that competitive edge in operations! If you’re looking for both fundamental and in-depth planning methods, strategies, and industry focused insight to either start or grow a scalable, sustainable, memorable, profitable, and consistent venue in today’s cut-throat industry, Bar Hacks is written just for you.

Pick up the paperback from Amazon today!

Hacking the New Normal: Hitting the Reset Button on the Hospitality Industry

Doug’s followup book to Bar Hacks! The world around us has changed. The food and beverage industry has changed. The hospitality industry has changed. But will some ways of life change for the better? Will perhaps the restaurant, bar, and hospitality industry come out even stronger? With the right changes to the previous status quo, it is possible. There’s no question, resets are major undertakings, but a major reset will provide us with a clean start and that’s what this industry needs.

Pick up KRG Hospitality president Doug Radkey’s second book today! Click here.

Image: Mikołaj on Unsplash

Business Plan for Boutique Hotel Motel Resort Property

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New Cocktail Festival Coming to Africa

New Cocktail & Spirits Festival Coming to Africa

by David Klemt

Colin Asare-Appiah and Mark Talbot Holmes

One of the most influential people in the hospitality industry, Colin Asare-Appiah, is bringing a new cocktail and spirits festival to South Africa in 2024.

Asare-Appiah is, of course, a bartender and spirits aficionado. However, he’s also an industry educator, author, a mentor, and historian. And he’s driven to shine a spotlight on the cocktail scenes throughout Africa.

AJABU, which means “wondrous” in Swahili, is the creation of Asare-Appiah and Mark Talbot Holmes, the founder of U’Luvka Vodka. From March 12 to 13, Johannesburg will be the first city to host AJABU. Cape Town will follow closely, with the festival taking place from March 15 to 16.

To put it plainly, the cocktail community doesn’t seem to pay much attention to African countries. At KRG Hospitality, we focus primarily on North America. So, I have to admit that when it comes to industry coverage, I’m guilty of overlooking African countries as well.

Looking back at industry awards from the past couple of years drives this point home. Bars, restaurants, hotels… If they’re not in Johannesburg or Cape Town, they’re not earning nominations, honorable mentions, or rankings, with very few exceptions.

Asare-Appiah and Talbot Holmes are aiming to change this situation. They duo and their collaborators intend to build international connections between trade, brands, and media through this bi-annual cocktail festival.

To learn more about this new industry gathering, please review the press release below. Cheers!

AJABU Cocktail and Spirits Festival Set to Debut in South Africa

New International Festival will Celebrate the Incredible Growth in the African Hospitality Community in 2024 and Beyond

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA – AJABU, Africa’s first bi-annual international Cocktail and Spirits festival, is set to debut in Johannesburg and Cape Town next year, with the first of two week-long events taking place from March 10-18, 2024.

Curated by Colin Asare-Appiah (Bar World 100 Most Influential Figures 2023, Co-Author Black Mixcellence, Tales of the Cocktail Foundation’s 2023 Spirited Awards® Finalist: Best Bar Mentor) and Mark Talbot Holmes (founder of U’Luvka Vodka). AJABU aims to become Africa’s leading spirits and cocktail festival. It will not only connect the hospitality industry and their community across Africa and beyond, it will also inspire innovation, collaboration, and creativity, while celebrating the continent’s incredible diversity of people, ingredients, and beverages.

The word AJABU means ‘wondrous’ or ‘amazing.’ As the name suggests, the festival will embrace the wondrous diversity of the hospitality industry across Africa, connecting brands, bar trade, media and cocktail enthusiasts, while supporting a new generation of African bartenders and hospitality professionals.

Taking place in both Johannesburg (March 10-13) and Cape Town (March 13-18), AJABU will host each city’s most renowned venues for a line-up of exciting mashups. Participating award-winning international bars include Library by the Sea, Milady’s, Rayo and Trailer Happiness. These teams will partner with bars across Africa such as Front Back and Hero for a week of education sessions, spirited forums, wine tours, and hosted dinners at local Johannesburg and Cape Town venues. In Johannesburg, festival-goers can look forward to experiencing the unique offerings of bars such as Sin + Tax, Saint, Smoking Kills, Cin Cin Zioux, Mesh Club, and Marabi Club. Meanwhile, Cape Town will host festivities at Cause/Effect, Art of Duplicity, Chef’s Warehouse, Hacienda, The Drinkery, House of Machines, Asoka, and Talking to Strangers.

“AJABU is a platform to celebrate Africa’s vibrant spirit and bartending culture,” exclaims Asare-Appiah. “We’re committed to fostering the growth of the hospitality industry across the continent by inspiring and empowering the bartending community to push the boundaries of their craft while providing a unique platform to showcase the diverse and rich culture of African drinks and ingredients.”

AJABU is thrilled to announce its partnership with local industry legends Kurt and Etienne Schlechter as well as award-winning writer & educator Leah Van Deventer as the team on the ground.

The festival will soon announce a lineup of the world’s best bars who will bring their creativity and knowledge to Johannesburg and Cape Town venues. Attendees can anticipate an unforgettable gathering of industry-leading professionals who will surprise and delight attendees with their creativity and innovation.

The March edition of AJABU will be followed by another week-long event across both cities in November, in partnership with Cape Town Beverage Show.

For more information, please visit ajabufestival.com

About AJABU

AJABU is Africa’s first annual international spirits and cocktail festival, created by Colin Asare-Appiah (Bar World’s 100 Most Influential Figures 2023, Co-Author Black Mixcellence of the Cocktail Foundation’s 2023 Spirited Awards® Finalist: Best Bar Mentor) and Mark Talbot Holmes (founder of U’Luvka Vodka). With a mission to become the continent’s leading hospitality community gathering, AJABU connects the industry across Africa and beyond to inspire innovation, collaboration, and creativity.

Image: AJABU

Bar Pub Brewery Nightclub Club Nightlife Business Plan

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

Last-minute Halloween Cocktails!

Last-minute Halloween Cocktails!

by David Klemt

Jameson Irish Whiskey Witches' Brew cocktail

If you perhaps let Halloween preparations get by you, have no fear: here are three Jameson Irish Whiskey cocktails that pair well with different candies.

These aren’t just any three cocktails, however. Instead, Jameson is recommending these drinks because they happen to pair well with three distinct flavors:

  • Tart and sour;
  • sweet; and
  • chocolate.

Makes sense, right? As guests arrive, hopefully in costumes, they may bring candy with them. Or, you may be serving up some mini-candies along with the drinks crossing your bar.

Either way, the drinks below will enhance the guest experience by pairing with an array of candies.

Cheers! Or, boo! Whatever you think is clever, I dunno.

Tart & Sour

Let’s say a guest is munching on some SweeTARTS, Sour Patch Kids, or Warheads. Basically, they’re enjoying tart and/or sour candies this Halloween.

The drink below, according to Jameson, will pair well with those candy flavors.

Jameson Irish Whiskey Witches' Brew cocktail

Witches’ Brew

Out of these three cocktails, this one requires the most prep. You’re going to steep teabags in boiling water and let it cool.

And if you choose to make your own raspberry syrup, your bar team will have to simmer water with sugar and raspberries for a couple of minutes. This will also have to cool before use.

However, this is a large-format drink, so the following recipe allows you to prebatch before guests descend on your bar.

  • 1 bottle Jameson Irish Whiskey
  • 1 carton Cranberry juice
  • 17 oz. Mint tea
  • 3.5 oz. Raspberry syrup
  • 6 Whole limes
  • 1 Orange
  • 12 Raspberries

Start by filling a large vessel with 17 ounces of boiling water. Add six mint teabags and let steep. Once cool, remove teabags. Juice the limes, slice the orange, and add to the vessel with the raspberries. Add the Jameson, cranberry juice, and syrup. Serve in a rocks glass over ice and garnish with raspberries and lime zest.

To make the syrup: In case you haven’t made syrup before, simply add 250mg of water, 250mg of sugar, and 100 grams of raspberries to a pot or saucepan and boil. After reducing to a simmer for two minutes, remove the pot or pan from heat. Let the syrup steep until cool, strain, bottle, and toss in a fridge.

Sweet

Does your guest have a sweet tooth? Are they chowing down on sweet, overly sugary candy? Maybe they’re throwing handfuls of candy corn down their gullet.

This is the drink for them!

Jameson Irish Whiskey Blood Rising cocktail

Blood Rising

From the most complex cocktail on this list to a simpler recipe.

Per Jameson, this cocktail is also known as the Blood Boiler.

  • 1 2/3 parts Jameson Black Barrel
  • 1 2/3 parts Lillet Rouge
  • 1 2/3 parts Orange juice
  • 1 1/6 parts Berry Syrup
  • Orange wedge to garnish
  • Berries to garnish

Prepare a rocks glass by placing a large ice cube inside. Combine all the liquid ingredients in the glass over the cube. Stir, then garnish with the orange and berries

To make the berry syrup: See the instructions above for the raspberry syrup.

Chocolate

I mean…chocolate. C’mon, it’s a loaded Halloween candy category. Snickers, Kit Kat bars, Milky Way bars, M&Ms, it doesn’t matter.

If a guest can’t resist the siren song of chocolate, the cocktail below will pair well with chocolatey notes.

Jameson Irish Whiskey Cold Brew Bittersweet Goodbye cocktail

Jameson Cold Brew Bittersweet Goodbye

If you’ve left your Halloween drink menu to the last minute, this is probably the quickest recipe on this list.

  • 1 1/3 parts Jameson Cold Brew
  • 1 1/3 parts Campari
  • 1 part Blood orange juice
  • 3 parts Tonic water
  • 1 Slice of a blood orange or red grapefruit to garnish

Fill a highball with ice, then add the first three ingredients. Add the tonic water and garnish.

Note: Orange also goes well with chocolate, so consider playing with Jameson Orange Whiskey if you have the time.

Images via Jameson Irish Whiskey

Bar Nightclub Pub Brewery Menu Development Drinks Food

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5 Books to Read this Month: August 2023

5 Books to Read this Month: August 2023

by David Klemt

Flipping through an open book

Our inspiring and informative August book selections will help you and your bar team take your front of house and bar program to the next level.

For this month’s list we’re showcasing the 17th annual Spirited Awards finalists in the Best New Cocktail or Bartending Book category. So, below you’ll find the top-four nominees in that particular category, plus an additional self-improvement book.

To review the book recommendations from July 2023, click here.

Let’s jump in!

The Bartender’s Manifesto: How to Think, Drink, and Create Cocktails Like a Pro

First up, this book from June 2022 by Toby Maloney with Emma Janzen. Not only has this book won a James Beard Award, it took home this year’s Spirited Award for Best New Cocktail or Bartending Book.

From Amazon: “Take a raucous romp through the essential stages of fashioning cocktails and learn the hows and whys of bartending with acclaimed mixologist Toby Maloney and the team from The Violet Hour. When the pioneering cocktail bar opened in Chicago in 2007, it set a high standard with an innovative training program that teaches not just how to replicate classic cocktail recipes flawlessly, but how to embrace ingenuity, make smart decisions, and create original, inspired recipes from rote.”

Pick up the hardcover here.

Mindful Mixology: A Comprehensive Guide to No- and Low-Alcohol Cocktails with 60 Recipes

Next, Mindful Mixology by Derek Brown, with a foreword by Julia Bainbridge. As all operators should know by now, low- and no-ABV cocktails are here to stay. From aperitivo hour and zero-alcohol to simply drinking less but better, consumers are changing their relationships with cocktails. This book will help operators and their teams navigate the moderation movement.

From Amazon: “Creating these drinks isn’t as simple as removing the alcohol. No- and low-proof cocktails still have to be balanced and still have to be delicious, but they don’t operate exactly like cocktails with alcohol. The drinks Brown presents in this book are meticulously choreographed around taste, texture, body, and piquancy to result in surprisingly complex ‘adult beverages’ minus the booze.”

Grab the hardcover today.

Modern Classic Cocktails: 60+ Stories and Recipes from the New Golden Age in Drinks

Robert Simonson is also a James Beard Award-winning author up for a 2023 Spirited Award. Not only are there more than 60 cocktail recipes in Simonson’s book, he explores what it means for someone to create a modern classic cocktail. No, your bar team can’t simply “invent” a new drink and declare it a modern classicthere are actual considerations, like public opinion, that make it so.

From Amazon: “What elevates a modern cocktail into the echelon of a modern classic? A host of reasons, all delineated by Simonson in these pages. But, above all, a modern classic cocktail must be popular. People have to order it, not just during its initial heyday, but for years afterward. Tommy’s Margarita, invented in the 1990s, is still beloved, and the Porn Star Martini is the most popular cocktail in the United Kingdom, twenty years after its creation.”

Make sure to get your hardcover copy today.

The New York Times Essential Book of Cocktails (Second Edition): Over 400 Classic Drink Recipes With Great Writing from The New York Times

If you want hundreds of cocktail recipes and amazing writing, this is the book for you. There are more than 400 recipes in this book, from classics to modern craft drinks. Oh, and there are essays from an array of fantastic writers, including Rebekah Peppler, David Wondrich, Robert Simonson, and Jim Meehan. There are also interviews with icons like Ivy Mix and Sother Teague.

Truly, this is one of the most comprehensive cocktail books every printed.

Pick up this book in hardcover format now.

Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones

A couple of weeks back, we had a KRG Hospitality team meeting about habits. Habits we’re proud to have developed, habits we’d like to focus on developing, and habits we’d like to work on losing. This book, from James Clear, is one of the resources we talked about.

From Amazon: “Clear is known for his ability to distill complex topics into simple behaviors that can be easily applied to daily life and work. Here, he draws on the most proven ideas from biology, psychology, and neuroscience to create an easy-to-understand guide for making good habits inevitable and bad habits impossible. Along the way, listeners will be inspired and entertained with true stories from Olympic gold medalists, award-winning artists, business leaders, life-saving physicians, and star comedians who have used the science of small habits to master their craft and vault to the top of their field.”

Order the paperback today.

Image: Mikołaj on Unsplash

KRG Hospitality Mindset Coaching

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Cheers to the Spirited Awards Winners!

Cheers to the 2023 Spirited Awards Winners!

by David Klemt

Bartender presenting cocktail

A toast to the nominees and winners!

Cheers to each of the winning bars, teams, and individuals taking home awards from the 17th annual Spirited Awards at Tales of the Cocktail 2023 in New Orleans!

Spirits educator, advocate, and bartender’s bartender Tiffanie Barriere earned the well-deserved Tales Visionary Award. Master Distiller Desmond Payne, MBE, took home the Helen David Lifetime Achievement Award.

Compellingly, a number of so-called secondary and tertiary markets are taking awards back to their home cities. These include Albuquerque, Phoenix, and Portland. Nothing against primary markets like New York City and Los Angeles, but it’s wonderful to see other cities grab the spotlight and shine, make their marks, and let everyone know, “We’ve arrived—don’t sleep on us!”

Unfortunately, Canada didn’t take home any international awards from Tales this year, nor did Las Vegas. Next year, hopefully.

Barcelona, however, can boast that it’s the home of the Spirited Award winner for the World’s Best Bar.

As far as our little experiment with artificial intelligence attempting to predict Spirited Awards winners, the chatbot we selected didn’t do very well. That said, it did accurately guess six out of the 24 awards we presented to the bot for a 25-percent success rate: Best US Brand Ambassador; International Bartender of the Year; Best International Bar Mentor; Best International Restaurant Bar; Best Broadcast, Podcast, or Online Video Series; and Best Cocktail & Spirits Writing.

Raise a glass and toast this year’s Spirited Awards winners. Cheers!

US Categories

US Bartender of the Year presented by Pernod Ricard USA

Christine Wiseman, Marygold’s Brasserie / Broken Shaker (Miami, Florida)

Best US Bar Mentor presented BarSmarts

Chris Patino

Best US Brand Ambassador presented Libbey

Vance Henderson (Hendrick’s Gin)*

Best US Bar Team presented by William Grant & Sons

Happy Accidents (Albuquerque, New Mexico)

Best US Cocktail Bar presented by Absolut Vodka

Century Grand (Phoenix, Arizona)

Best US Hotel Bar presented by Grey Goose

Hey Love at The Jupiter (Portland, Oregon)

Best US Restaurant Bar presented by Amaro Montenegro and Select Aperitivo

Café La Trova (Miami, Florida)

Best New US Cocktail Bar presented by Diageo Bar Academy

Martiny’s (New York, New York)

Timeless US Award

Tiki-Ti (Los Angeles, California)

International Categories

International Bartender of the Year presented by The Busker

Giorgio Bargiani, Connaught Bar (London, England, United Kingdom)*

Best International Bar Mentor presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

Agostino Perrone*

Best International Brand Ambassador presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

Nicola Riske (The Macallan)

Best International Bar Team presented by Angostura Caribbean Rum

ALQUÍMICO (Cartagena, Colombia)

Best International Cocktail Bar presented by Patr​​ón Tequila

SIPS (Barcelona, Spain)

Best International Hotel Bar presented by Perrier

Jigger & Pony at the Amara Hotel (Singapore)

Best International Restaurant Bar presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

Analogue Initiative (Singapore)*

Best New International Cocktail Bar presented by Diageo Bar Academy

Line Athens (Athens, Greece)

Timeless International Award

Long Bar at the Raffles Hotel (Singapore)

Global Categories

Tales Visionary Award

Tiffanie Barriere

Helen David Lifetime Achievement Award

Desmond Payne, MBE

World’s Best Bar

SIPS (Barcelona, Spain)

Best New Spirit or Cocktail Ingredient presented by Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic

Martini & Rossi Floreale Non Alcoholic Aperitivo

World’s Best Cocktail Menu presented by Diageo Bar Academy

Double Chicken Please (New York, New York)

World’s Best Spirits Selection presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

Raised by Wolves (San Diego, California)

Writing & Media Categories

Best Cocktail & Spirits Publication presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

Punch

Best Broadcast, Podcast, or Online Video Series presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

The Speakeasy Podcast*

Best Cocktail & Spirits Writing presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

The Great Mezcal Heist” by Emma Janzen, for Eater*

Best New Cocktail or Bartending Book presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

The Bartender’s Manifesto by Toby Maloney with Emma Janzen

Best New Book on Drinks Culture, History, or Spirits presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

Modern Caribbean Rum: A Contemporary Reference to the Region’s Essential Spirit by Matt Pietrek and Carrie Smith

Congratulations to each of the venues, teams, and individual winners! Cheers!

Bar Hacks Guests

The following Spirited Awards presenters, winners, and TOTC team have appeared on the Bar Hacks podcast. Give these episodes a listen to learn more about these amazing people!

Vance Henderson (episode 20)

Episode 48, Episode 65, and the Hurricane Ida Emergency Episode with Eileen Wayner

Lynn House (episode 52)

Kellie Thorn and Lola Thomas (episode 72)

Roberta Mariani (episode 84)

* Denotes an accurate prediction by DeepAI‘s AI Chat chatbot.

Image: Christian Fridell on Pexels

KRG Hospitality. Bar Consultant. Nightclub. Lounge. Mixology. Cocktails.

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

The Year of Pineau des Charentes?

The Year of Pineau des Charentes?

by David Klemt

A dock and door in the Charente-Maritime department of France

A pier and door in the Charente-Maritime department of France, home of Pineau des Charentes.

Take Cognac’s eponymous and legendary brandy, add grape juice or grape must, mature the blend, and you get Pineau des Charentes.

Pineau, a less unwieldy name for this vin de liqueur, comes in white, red, and rosé styles. Unfortunately, owing to Pineau not being as famous as Cognac, these fortified wines aren’t very well known to the general public.

However, bartenders and bar owners are trying to turn that around. In fact, the iconic Ivy Mix theorized last week that 2023 could become the Year of Pineau.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Ivy Mix (@ivymix)

Toward the bottom of her post, Mix says it’s “[t]time to [p]lay with Pineau!” She also includes a recipe for a Pineau-led version of the Saturn cocktail.

Pineau is excellent for hot summer days, and it plays well in tiki or nautical drinks and other cocktails.

Of course, Mix’s post got me thinking: Do enough people know about Pineau to help guide their guests in discovering it and adding it to their beverage rotation?

So, below you’ll get a crash course in Pineau des Charentes, your and your guests’ new favorite fortified wine.

Mix has been a guest of the Bar Hacks podcast, featuring on episode 54 and episode 58 if you’d like to learn more about her approach to hospitality.

A Happy Accident?

If you know anything about me, you know I love a good drink origin story. This is mainly due to the fact that there are either disputes or we’re simply perpetuating a guess or theory.

Well, Pineau des Charentes has a bit of a “foggy” origin itself.

From what I can find, this vin de liqueur traces its roots back to a winemaker in the late 1500s—supposedly. Rumor has it that he put grape must—freshly crushed grape juice—into what he mistook for an empty barrel. In reality, the barrel, which was put to rest for a few years, contained Cognac.

Bippity, boppity, booze, Pineau was born. In 1921, a winemaker in Burie, a commune in Charente-Maritime, commercialized Pineau.

How it’s Made

Production, while controlled, is straightforward.

In most cases, a single house handles production on their own. They grow the grapes that become brandy, they make the juice by pressing more grapes, and they add the juice to the eau de vie.

For the curious, the grapes most often used in the production of Pineau are:

  • Cabernet Franc
  • Cabernet Sauvignon
  • Colombard
  • Folle Blanche
  • Jurancon
  • Merlot
  • Merlot Blanc
  • Meslier St Francois
  • Montils
  • Sauvignon Blanc
  • Semillon
  • Ugni Blanc

Many people are probably familiar with the term for blending eau de vie with juice: assemblage. However, they may be less familiar with the result of assemblage: mutage. This step simply stops the fermentation process.

With assemblage completed—the ratios are highly controlled—the blend is matured. A white Pineau must spend 18 months maturing, 12 of those months in an oak barrel. For a red Pineau, those numbers are 12 months and eight months.

Then, the Pineau is bottled. As mentioned at the start of this section, Pineau is controlled; it’s subject to the rules of the vin de liqueur Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée, or AOC. So, Pineau must be bottled within its AOC region.

Types of Pineau des Charentes

At the top of this article I mention that there are white, red, and rosé Pineaus. In other words, there will be a familiarity with Pineau from the wine drinkers amongst guests. This can, of course, make it easier to introduce it to them.

White Pineau, the most widely known style, is broken down into:

  • blanc, minimum aging (18 months, 12 in oak barrels);
  • vieux blanc, spending at least five years in oak casks; and
  • très vieux blanc, resting for at least 10 years in oak.

That brings us to red Pineau and its age breakdown:

  • rouge, minimum aging (12 months, eight in oak casks);
  • vieux rouge, resting for a minimum of five years in oak; and
  • très vieux rouge, spending at least 10 years in oak barrels.

Red is the most popular style of Pineau in its home region.

Now, when it comes to rosé Pineau, the aging is very similar to red or rouge. However, the line of separation, based upon maceration time, is quite thin.

Speaking of familiarity, by the way, many well-known Cognac houses also produce Pineau. This means guests should recognize names like Rémy Martin, Pierre Ferrand, and Hardy.

How it Tastes

All of this leads us to the big question that will be on your bar team and guests’ minds: What does Pineau taste like?

Generally speaking, Pineau is sweet. However, it’s not sweet in an overwhelming way. Rather, your guest-facing team members can explain that Pineau is described as having a natural sweetness. Older styles also tend to deliver more complex profiles, including flavors such as honey and nuts.

Of course, the best way to know how to describe a given Pineau in your inventory is to taste your team on each expression.

Pineau is most often enjoyed chilled and served in a tulip-shaped glass. However, as Mix and other bartenders will tell you, Pineau performs very well as a base or modifier in cocktails.

And at 16- to 22-percent ABV (most often 17 percent), Pineau is similar in proof to Sherry and Port. In fact, I recommend creating a fortified wine flight (premium price for premium products and a premium experience) that allows guests to compare Sherry, Port, and Pineau.

To get things started, Mix’s Pineau-based Saturn recipe is below. Cheers!

Venus’s Point

  • 1.5 oz. Pineau de Charentes White ​(Mix uses Pierre Ferrand in the Instagram post above)
  • 0.5 oz Agricole Rhum (Mix uses JM in the Instagram post above)​
  • 0.75 oz. Fresh lemon juice​
  • 0.25 oz. Passionfruit syrup​
  • 0.25 oz. Orgeat​
  • Lemon wheel​ to garnish

Simply shake, strain, serve up, and garnish.

Image: Les Argonautes on Unsplash

KRG Hospitality. Bar Consultant. Nightclub. Lounge. Mixology. Cocktails.

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

The 50 Best Bars in Asia in 2023

The 50 Best Bars in Asia in 2023

by David Klemt

Bartender presenting cocktail in upscale setting

2023 Asia’s 50 Best Bars Bartenders’ Feast.

Join us in congratulating each of the bars and their teams earning placements on the 2023 Asia’s 50 Best Bars list by the World’s 50 Best Bars.

As is often the case, Hong Kong and Singapore claim an exceptional number of bars. I fully expect to see a handful of the bars on the list below on the World’s 50 Best Bars list this year.

Speaking of which, that ceremony, the 15th edition of the list, will take place on October 17 in Singapore. Again, I expect the host city to claim multiple spots.

Cheers to Asia’s 50 Best Bars for 2023!

To review the 2023 Asia’s 50 Best Bars, 51 to 100 list, please click here.

By the Numbers

While Singapore doesn’t claim the number one spot this year, the island country does boast 11 entrants. Further, three of Singapore’s bars hold spots in the top ten.

Hong Kong is home to eight bars on this year’s Asia’s 50 Best Bars list. Like Singapore, three bars in Hong Kong are among the top ten.

There are seven bars in Japan (five in Tokyo), one earning a top-ten slot. Six of the bars on the 2023 list are in Seoul, South Korea.

Thailand and India both have four bars on the list. The former boasts two bars in the top ten.

There are three bars in Taiwan among the fifty.

Malaysia and Indonesia each have two bars among Asia’s 50 Best Bars in 2023. Both of Malaysia’s bars in Kuala Lumpur, and both of Indonesia’s are in Jakarta.

Mainland China, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka each have a bar on this year’s list.

100 Incredible Bars

When we take the back half of this list into account, Singapore continues its domination, with 19 bars earning placement.

Hong Kong boosts its number of bars to 13, and Japan adds seven bars to bump its total to an even dozen. Seoul, South Korea, claims eight bars total.

Thailand, counting both lists, has eight amazing bars, as does Taiwan. In total, there are nine bars in India. Six bars in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and there are a total of four bars in China.

The Philippines have one bar on the one to 50 list, and one on the 51 to 100 list, for a total of two bars among Asia’s 100 best.

The Best Bar In:

Hong Kong: Coa

India: Sidecar

Japan: Bar Benfiddich

Korea: Zest

Mainland China: Hope & Sesame

Malaysia: Bar Trigona

Philippines: The Curator

Singapore: Jigger & Pony

Sri Lanka: Smoke & Bitters

Taiwan: Indulge Experimental Bistro

Thailand: BKK Social Club

See the list below for the Best Bar in Asia.

Asia’s 50 Best Bars: 50 to 1

  1. Penrose (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)*
  2. The Bellwood (Tokyo, Japan)*
  3. The Living Room (Mumbai, India)*
  4. The Old Man (Hong Kong)**
  5. Soko (Seoul, South Korea)*
  6. High Five (Tokyo, Japan)**
  7. Bee’s Knees (Kyoto, Japan)
  8. The Public House (Taipei, Taiwan)*
  9. Native (Singapore)**
  10. Vender (Taichung, Taiwan)*
  11. Smoke & Bitters (Hiriketiya, Sri Lanka)(The Best Bar in Sri Lanka)
  12. Hope & Sesame (Guangzhou, China)(The Best Bar in Mainland China)
  13. Copitas (Bengaluru, India)
  14. Southside Parlor (Seoul, South Korea)*
  15. Bar Trigona (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)(The Best Bar in Malaysia)
  16. The Bombay Canteen (Mumbai, India)*
  17. The Curator (Manila, Philippines)(The Best Bar in the Philippines)**
  18. Mostly Harmless (Hong Kong)*
  19. Stay Gold Flamingo (Singapore)*
  20. Quinary (Hong Kong)
  21. Employees Only (Singapore)**
  22. Pantja (Jakarta, Indonesia)*
  23. Alice (Seoul, South Korea)
  24. Atlas (Singapore)
  25. Penicillin (Hong Kong)
  26. Le Chamber (Seoul, South Korea)
  27. 28 HongKong Street (Singapore)
  28. Lamp Bar (Nara, Japan)
  29. Mahaniyom Cocktail Bar (Bangkok, Thailand)(London Essence Best New Opening)*
  30. Manhattan (Singapore)
  31. Virtù (Tokyo, Japan)(Disaronno Highest New Entry)
  32. The Cocktail Club (Jakarta, Indonesia)(Siete Misterios Best Cocktail Menu, the Best Bar in Indonesia)
  33. Sidecar (New Delhi, India)(The Best Bar in India)
  34. The Aubrey (Hong Kong)
  35. Republic (Singapore)
  36. Analogue Initiative (Singapore)(Ketel One Sustainable Bar)
  37. The SG Club (Tokyo, Japan)
  38. Cham Bar (Seoul, South Korea)
  39. Vesper (Bangkok, Thailand)
  40. Indulge Experimental Bistro (Taipei, Taiwan)(The Best Bar in Taiwan)
  41. Sago House (Singapore)(Michter’s Art of Hospitality)
  42. Darkside (Hong Kong)
  43. Argo (Hong Kong)
  44. Nutmeg & Clove (Singapore)
  45. Tropic City (Bangkok, Thailand)
  46. Zest (Seoul, South Korea)(Nikka Highest Climber, the Best Bar in Korea)
  47. Bar Benfiddich (Tokyo, Japan)(The Best Bar in Japan)
  48. BKK Social Club (Bangkok, Thailand)(The Best Bar in Thailand)
  49. Jigger & Pony (Singapore)(Rémy Martin Legend of the List, the Best Bar in Singapore)
  50. Coa (Hong Kong)(The Best Bar in Asia, the Best Bar in Hong Kong)

Congratulations to each of the operators and bar teams above! Cheers!

* Denotes new entry, ** denotes re-entry.

Image: The World’s 50 Best Bars

KRG Hospitality. Bar Consultant. Nightclub. Lounge. Mixology. Cocktails.

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

Tales Reveals Top 4 Awards Finalists

Tales Reveals Top 4 2023 Spirited Awards Finalists

by David Klemt

Cocktail with orange peel garnish resting on glossy white bar top

We’re one month away from the 17th annual Spirited Awards ceremony and the top four nominees in each category have been revealed.

Over the course of the past few months, the Tales of the Cocktail Foundation have been hard at work to narrow the field. They first announced this year’s honorees. Not long ago, they announced the top ten nominees.

Now, we know the top four nominees in the running for each of the Spirited Awards. You can check them out below, with each award organized into one of four main categories: US, International, Global, and Writing & Media.

Congrats to the finalists! We’ll know the winners in just a month.

Cheers!

US Categories

US Bartender of the Year presented by Pernod Ricard USA

  • Caer Maiko Ferguson, DrinkWell / Daijoubu (Austin, Texas)
  • Kapri Robinson, Allegory at the Eaton Hotel (Washington, DC)
  • Masahiro Urushido, Katana Kitten (New York, New York)
  • Christine Wiseman, Marygold’s Brasserie / Broken Shaker (Miami, Florida)

Best US Bar Mentor presented BarSmarts

  • Anu Apte
  • Colin Asare-Appiah
  • Nectaly Mendoza
  • Chris Patino

Best US Brand Ambassador presented Libbey

  • Kiowa Bryan (Spiribam)
  • Chris Cabrera (Bacardi USA)
  • Cameron George (Ardbeg Single Malts)
  • Vance Henderson (Hendrick’s Gin)

Best US Bar Team presented by William Grant & Sons

  • Happy Accidents (Albuquerque, New Mexico)
  • Nickel City (Austin, Texas)
  • Pacific Cocktail Haven (San Francisco, California)
  • Yacht Club (Denver, Colorado)

Best US Cocktail Bar presented by Absolut Vodka

  • Century Grand (Phoenix, Arizona)
  • Double Chicken Please (New York, New York)
  • Overstory (New York, New York)
  • Service Bar (Washington, DC)

Best US Hotel Bar presented by Grey Goose

  • Allegory at the Eaton Hotel (Washington, DC)
  • Dear Irving on Hudson at the Aliz Hotel (New York, New York)
  • Hey Love at The Jupiter (Portland, Oregon)
  • Little Rituals at the Residence Inn/Courtyard by Marriott (Phoenix, Arizona)

Best US Restaurant Bar presented by Amaro Montenegro and Select Aperitivo

  • Café La Trova (Miami, Florida)
  • Cleaver Butchered Meats & Seafood (Las Vegas, Nevada)
  • Kumiko (Chicago, Illinois)
  • Palomar (Portland, Oregon)

Best New US Cocktail Bar presented by Diageo Bar Academy

  • Chez Zou (New York, New York)
  • Martiny’s (New York, New York)
  • Milady’s (New York, New York)
  • Pacific Standard at the KEX Portland (Portland, Oregon)

International Categories

International Bartender of the Year presented by The Busker

  • Gina Barbachano, Hanky Panky (Mexico City, Mexico)
  • Giorgio Bargiani, Connaught Bar (London, England, United Kingdom)
  • Daniel Schofield, SCHOFIELD’S BAR (Manchester, England, United Kingdom)
  • Luke Whearty, BYRDI (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

Best International Bar Mentor presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • Simone Caporale
  • Danil Nevsky
  • Agostino Perrone
  • Christina Veira

Best International Brand Ambassador presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • Caitlin Hill (Rémy Cointreau)
  • Daniyel Jones (House of Angostura)
  • Dave Mitton (Lot 40 / J.P. Wiser’s)
  • Nicola Riske (The Macallan)

Best International Bar Team presented by Angostura Caribbean Rum

  • ALQUÍMICO (Cartagena, Colombia)
  • Atwater Cocktail Club (Montréal, Québec, Canada)
  • Jigger & Pony at the Amara Hotel (Singapore)
  • Paradiso (Barcelona, Spain)

Best International Cocktail Bar presented by Patr​​ón Tequila

  • 🔶🟥🔵 (London, UK)
  • ALQUÍMICO (Cartagena, Colombia)
  • Atwater Cocktail Club (Montréal, Québec, Canada)
  • SIPS (Barcelona, Spain)

Best International Hotel Bar presented by Perrier

  • ARGO at the Four Seasons (Hong Kong)
  • BKK Social Club at Four Seasons Bangkok (Bangkok, Thailand)
  • Botanist at the Fairmont Pacific Rim Hotel (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada)
  • Jigger & Pony at the Amara Hotel (Singapore)

Best International Restaurant Bar presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • Analogue Initiative (Singapore)
  • ARCA Restaurant & Bar (Tulum, Quintana Roo, Mexico)
  • Bar Kismet (Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada)
  • Danico (Paris, France)

Best New International Cocktail Bar presented by Diageo Bar Academy

  • Last Word (Singapore)
  • Line Athens (Athens, Greece)
  • Mahaniyom Cocktail Bar (Bangkok, Thailand)
  • Night Hawk (Singapore)

Global Categories

Best New Spirit or Cocktail Ingredient presented by Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic

  • Martini & Rossi Floreale Non Alcoholic Aperitivo
  • PATRÓN El Alto Tequila
  • Saint Benevolence Aged Rum Clairin
  • The Fords Gin Co. Sloe Gin

World’s Best Cocktail Menu presented by Diageo Bar Academy

  • ALQUÍMICO (Cartagena, Colombia)
  • Double Chicken Please (New York, New York)
  • Handshake Speakeasy (Mexico City, Mexico)
  • Panda & Sons (Edinburgh, Scotland)

World’s Best Spirits Selection presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • Baba Au Rum (Athens, Greece)
  • In Situ Mezcalería (Oaxaca, Mexico)
  • Raised by Wolves (San Diego, California)
  • Swift Soho (London, England, United Kingdom)

Writing & Media Categories

Best Cocktail & Spirits Publication presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • CLASS Magazine
  • Difford’s Guide
  • Punch
  • The Cocktail Lovers Magazine

Best Broadcast, Podcast, or Online Video Series presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • Black and Brown Podcast
  • Radio Imbibe
  • Shōshin Art Club
  • The Speakeasy Podcast

Best Cocktail & Spirits Writing presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • “The Drinks Industry Has an Ageism Problem” by Betsy Andrews, for SevenFifty Daily
  • “The Great Mezcal Heist” by Emma Janzen, for Eater
  • “The Secrets to the Best Dry Martini You’ll Ever Have” by David Wondrich, for The Daily Beast
  • “This Is What Decolonizing a Spirit Looks Like” by Adaorah Oduah, for Punch

Best New Cocktail or Bartending Book presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • Mindful Mixology: A Comprehensive Guide to No- and Low-Alcohol Cocktails with 60 Recipes by Derek Brown
  • Modern Classic Cocktails by Robert Simonson
  • The Bartender’s Manifesto by Toby Maloney with Emma Janzen
  • The New York Times Essential Book of Cocktails – Elevated and Expanded, edited by Steven Reddicliffe

Best New Book on Drinks Culture, History, or Spirits presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • A SENSE OF PLACE: A Journey Around Scotland’s Whisky by Dave Broom
  • Doctors and Distillers: The Remarkable Medicinal History of Beer, Wine, Spirits, and Cocktails by Camper English
  • Modern Caribbean Rum: A Contemporary Reference to the Region’s Essential Spirit by Matt Pietrek and Carrie Smith
  • Unreasonable Hospitality by Will Guidara

Image: cottonbro studio on Pexels

KRG Hospitality. Bar Consultant. Nightclub. Lounge. Mixology. Cocktails.

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

Fire and Ice: Bring Your Teams Together

Fire and Ice: Bring Your Teams Together

by Jared Boller

Ice on fire inside of a Martini glass

If you want to elevate your concept you need to ensure the front- and back-of-house teams are working with each other, not against one another.

There’s nothing wrong with a healthy rivalry and competition, of course. But the key word there is “healthy.” Both teams are crucial to your success, even if they seem like polar opposites.

Analogies are one of the singular greatest educational selling points when you have a group of people in front of you. Not only do they help you get your point across, they also help you to make a topic relatable to the listening novice.

In hospitality there are numerous ways to use analogies as teaching tools. When it comes to mixology or bartending, I like to use fire and ice to represent the kitchen and the bar.

I take this approach because the bar (ice) is the friendly counterpart to the fast and furious kitchen (fire). If you follow my train of thought, you’ll see why I preferthis approach: ultimately, we’re speaking about temperature and its importance in both spaces.

Consider the art of crafting cocktails. You and your bar team should understand dilution and melting rates the same way you know how important temperatures are to steaks. Nine times out of ten, individuals at the table have a personal preference regarding the temperature of their steak.

Guests don’t hesitate to relay this information to the server. Next, the chef and their brigade uses fire and cooking times to ensure each state is cooked properly. Not only that, the mastery of their craft leads to each steak coming out at the same time, cooked to each guest’s preference.

This process is the same for the bar. Stirred, shaken, egg-white cocktails… Bartenders must master their craft to ensure they understand the different types and uses of ice (or no ice) when building drinks. Moreover, they need to use that knowledge to ensure each drink for a table or group comes out at the same time, with the appropriate level of coldness.

In the end, when drinks hit the pass or server’s station, we want drink orders to be delivered as quickly as possible because they’re on the clock. The ice in the drinks start to melt. Hot food begins to get cold. We’re fighting time.

Understanding temperatures and times relates directly to the guest experience. We can tell how well-oiled and skillful front- and back-of-house teams are by watching drinks and dishes hit tables.

Fire

According to Anthropologist Richard Wrangham, who wrote the book Catching fire: How Cooking Made Us Human, people started cooking over open fire more than two million years ago.

Wrangham states that cooking was first seen as “simply chunking a raw hunk of something into flames and watching it sizzle.” Modern chefs may not agree with this style but we are able to see that early human “cooks” came to a few realizations regarding their use of fire. Their food was healthier, tastier, and they may have had more revitalized immune systems.

Obviously, the evolution of modern cooking techniques have advanced through tools, techniques, and vessels over the years. However, regardless of how much innovation we introduce to our kitchens, we’re still using fire and heat to cook our food.

Unless they’re expecting a salad, sushi, or another amazing raw or cold food, guests anticipate their food will be hot or warm upon arriving in front of them. Great chefs take control of their kitchens, techniques, and tools. Their masters of temperature. They have a nearly supernatural understanding of timing.

It’s always a site to behold when someone is masterful in the kitchen. A seemingly endless number of pots and pans raging on burners. Infinite elements of dishes flowing in and out of ovens. Chaos to the novice’s eyes but in reality, flawlessly composed dishes arriving at perfect temperatures.

Ice

We can trace the use of ice in drinks as far back as ancient Egypt. Icy drinks are also well documented by first-century Roman society; emperors, it’s claimed, enjoyed “chilled” cocktails via glacier runoff extracted from the mountains.

Emperors, according to some historians, would store giant blocks of ice in cool cellars, garnishing their tipples with shards of ice. This was both a decadent display of their elite status, and evidence that humans have long appreciated a cold, refreshing drink.

It wasn’t until early 1800s Boston that humankind really began to master ice. A young entrepreneur, Frederic “The Ice King” Tudor, pursued an idea with his brother and launched the ice or frozen water trade. Over the course of just a few decades, the New England-based trade was able to ship ice worldwide.

The Wenham Lake Ice Company, established in the 1840s, harvested giant blocks from the eponymous lake and stored them in a network of ice houses, accessed by a small railroad system. Once a luxury, ice was on its way to going mainstream. Everyone was coming to the realization that drinks tasted better with a bit of dilution and colder temperatures.

Eventually, ice production led to ice harvesting innovations. For example, Clinebell machines that use cold plates to 300-pound, crystal-clear blocks. Along with being clear, the ice blocks are super dense to reduce dilution rates significantly. From glaciers to “harvesting” ice from lakes to full-on factory production, our obsession with ice has led to technological innovation.

Interestingly, however, early 19th century methods of ice extraction are once again in vogue. A cadre of passionate bartenders who view ice as a premium ingredient in and of itself are hand carving ice cubes, spheres, and spears for perfectly curated Negronis or Old-fashioneds.

Takeaway

The bottom line is, temperature is important to anyone working in hospitality. Kitchen and bar teams need to work together to create the best possible products.

Some people think of food or drinks when asked to consider the best restaurants and bars in the world. However, those are products. What sets the best concepts apart is the teams they’ve each built and nurtured.

It’s the passion of each team member and their consideration of the fine details that makes a restaurant or bar notable. So, when we think about fire and ice, we can consider this idea the ultimate geekery in regard to our profession.

Take it from me: When the front of the house and back of the house collaborate, then they’re in sync with one another and nail the small details, they transform first-time guests to repeat brand evangelists.

They may not understand why their experience was so incredible but they’ll become outspoken ambassadors.

Image: Alexander Startsev on Unsplash

KRG Hospitality Mixology Training with Jared Boller

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

Rosa is Pink, Lowlands Agave is Blue

Rosa is Pink, Lowlands Agave is Blue…

by David Klemt

Código 1530 Rosa Tequila and cocktail

Código 1530 is proud to present Valentine’s Day cocktails from Travis Pentecost of Tu Madre and Abby Blanchard of Broken Shaker.

Even more relevant for Valentine’s Day, each of the tequila-forward four recipes below is made with Código 1530 Rosa Blanco. As you can tell from the bottle image above, Rosa Blanco is a rosé tequila.

This particular tequila’s characteristic comes from the aging process. As the name implies, Rosa begins life as a blanco. But after one month in uncharred Napa Valley Cabernet French White Oak wine barrels, the liquid takes on a pink hue.

Produced using lowlands Blue Weber Agave, Código 1530 is precise about Rosa Blanco’s aging time. Too short and the barrels wouldn’t influence the tequila. Longer than one month and the wine barrel flavors would overpower the agave.

Código 1530’s exacting production and aging techniques result in their signature blanco delivering soft red wine notes on the palate, and a subtly floral finish. Rosa’s aging process enhances Blanco’s rich and bright earthy, mineral, and citrus notes.

If you have guests who are tequila fans—particularly those who love blanco—Rosa Blanco is a great conversation starter and upsale.

Codigo 1530 Kisses and Roses cocktail

Kisses and Roses

recipe by Travis Pentecost (Tu Madre)

  • 1.5 oz. Código 1530 Rosa Blanco Tequila
  • 0.5 oz. Chinola
  • 1 oz. Fresh lime juice
  • 0.75 oz. Orgeat
  • 2 dashes Plum bitters
  • Lemon slice to garnish
  • Edible flower to garnish

Add all ingredients to a shaker and strain into a Collins glass. Garnish with lemon slice and edible flower.

Codigo 1530 Will You Cherry Me cocktail

Will You Cherry Me

recipe by Travis Pentecost (Tu Madre)

  • 1.5 oz. Código 1530 Rosa Blanco Tequila
  • 0.5 oz. St-Germain
  • 1 oz. Prickly Pear liqueur
  • 1 oz. Fresh lemon juice
  • 2 dashes Cherry bitters
  • Fresh mint leaves to garnish
  • Lemon slice to garnish
  • Edible flower to garnish

Add all ingredients to a shaker and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with fresh mint leaf “bouquet,” lemon slice, and edible flower.

Codigo 1530 Sandia Margarita cocktail

Sandia Margarita

recipe by Travis Pentecost (Tu Madre)

  • 2 oz. Código 1530 Rosa Blanco Tequila
  • 1 oz. Fresh watermelon juice
  • 1 oz. Fresh lime juice
  • 1 oz. Pina Agave
  • 2 dashes Peach bitters
  • Fresh mint leaves to garnish
  • Orange slice to garnish
  • Gummy watermelon candies to garnish
  • Edible flower to garnish
  • Salt for rim

Add all ingredients to a shaker and strain into a prepared cocktail glass. Garnish with “bouquet” of fresh mint leaves, orange slice, gummy watermelon candies, and edible flower.

Codigo 1530 You Up? cocktail

You Up?

recipe by Abby Blanchard (Broken Shaker)

  • 2 oz. Código 1530 Rosa Blanco Tequila
  • 1 oz. Fresh lime juice
  • 0.75 oz. Simple Syrup
  • 3 Raspberries, muddled
  • Raspberries to garnish
  • Raspberry gummy candy to garnish (optional)
  • Edible flower to garnish (optional)

Add all ingredients to a shaker and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with raspberries. Optional garnishes: addition of raspberry gummy candy and/or edible flower

KRG Hospitality Bar 101 Techniques

Images: Código 1530

Disclaimer: Neither the author nor KRG Hospitality received compensation, monetary or otherwise, from Volley or any other entity in exchange for this post.

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