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Datassential Identifies Top Design Trends

Datassential Identifies Top Design Trends

by David Klemt

Maximalist interior bar or restaurant design

For their latest FoodBytes research topic, Datassential tackles some of the top restaurant design trends.

Click here to download Datassential’s “Foodbytes: Restaurant Design Trends” report. If you haven’t already, you’ll need to sign up for FoodBytes reports.

As the title states, this Datassential resource addresses the state of restaurant design. Now, we recommend reading the report for yourself but below you’ll find the points that really stand out to us.

If you’re among the 22 percent of operators that Datassential says are either considering a dining room redesign or have completed one, this report is particularly relevant to you.

Back-0f-house Design

Unsurprisingly, most people envision the interior dining area when considering restaurant design. However, as Lauren Charbonneau of Reitano Design Group says in Datassential’s latest FoodBytes, “Restaurants are living spaces that need to be agile.”

That means considering the entire space, not just the front of house. There’s also this stat from Datassential: 64 percent of operators think shrinking their footprint would be detrimental. If that’s the case, making the BoH smaller rather than the front may be the way forward.

So, let’s take a look at what Charbonneau identifies as BoH design trends to consider.

Clearly, it’s crucial operators consider their back-of-house teams. Providing a better workplace experience and improving efficiency can be done through design. Per Charbonneau, operators can use clever design and equipment choices to reduce steps, movement, labor, footprint, and costs.

Additionally, sustainability is not only crucial to responsible operation, being sustainable can reduce costs. Selecting Energy Star, Water Sense, and multi-functional equipment can make tasks easier for BoH teams, make a business more sustainable, and, again, drive down costs.

Maximalist Design

Finally, it seems, the minimalist design trend is losing its stranglehold on restaurant design. Of course, if that approach and design language works for a particular concept, it works.

However, maximalism is growing in popularity. For this type of design, think lots of color and bold patterns. Then, think about using multiple patterns and textures, including on the floors.

So, wallpaper, artwork, plush seating, loud tiles… Per Datassential, maximalism appeals to younger guests. In part, this is because these spaces can offer so many Instagrammable moments.

Monochrome Design

Okay, before we begin, “monochrome” doesn’t only mean a black-and-white palette. While that can work very well depending on the concept, monochrome also means using different tones of a single color.

Of course, there are multiple ways to approach this design trend. For example, if one does want to select a black-and-white scheme, Matte Black Coffee in Los Angeles is compelling.

Not only is the design monochrome, guests feel as though they’re inside a two-dimensional image. Per Datassential, this type of design is growing in popularity across the US specifically.

In terms of colorful monochrome, a great example is NYC’s Pietro Nolita. Not only have they chosen pink for their palette, it’s a core element of their branding: Pink AF.

Yet another way to approach this trend is for operators to use varying tones of particular colors to delineate different spaces. So, the dining room may be tones of pink while the bar is green and a private dining room is blue.

Nostalgic Design

As we’re all well aware, the pandemic derailed people’s plans. In particular, people hit the pause or cancel button on travel and vacations. Now, people appear to restarting their travel plans and getting back out there.

However, we’re also dealing with inflation. So, many people are holding off on spending money on travel. This is where restaurant design comes into play.

According to Datassential, “nostalgic escape” is a trend to watch moving forward. While very specific, this trend combines a dive into the past and capturing vacation vibes.

Per their FoodBytes report, Datassential identifies the following elements as key to this design approach:

  • Soft shades of colors. In particular, pink.
  • Tropical designs.
  • Fifties, Eighties, and Nineties design elements.

One concept that leverages this trend and did so before the pandemic is the Hampton Social. Currently, there are eight locations and two more are on the way.

Of course, it’s imperative that operators commit only to design language that’s authentic to their concepts. Pursuing a trend simply to pursue it is a clear path to disaster. That said, these design trends have massive appeal and can work for many operators and their brands.

Image: Davide Castaldo on Unsplash

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

Tales Reveals 2022 Spirited Awards Winners

Tales of the Cocktail Reveals 2022 Spirited Awards Winners

2022 Spirited Award winner Lynn House

2022 Spirited Award winner Lynn House

Congratulations to the 2022 Spirited Awards winners, revealed last week during the 20th anniversary of Tales of the Cocktail.

First opening their doors in 2018, NYC’s Katana Kitten took home two awards. The dream team trio of Masahiro Urushido, Greg Boehm, and James Tune won Best US Cocktail Bar and best US Bar team.

Another American venue that won two Spirited Awards is Jewel of the South in New Orleans. Opened in 2019, Jewel of the South was crowned Best US Restaurant Bar. Additionally, the US Bartender of the Year is Chris Hannah, co-owner of the NOLA dining and drinking destination.

We also want to extend a special congratulations to Bar Hacks guest Lynn House. To learn more about House, this year’s Best US Brand Ambassador, check out episode 52 of Bar Hacks.

Internationally, two bars also took home multiple awards. 🔶🟥🔵 A Bar with Shapes for a Name and Lyaness at Sea Containers London, both in London, won two Spirited Awards. The former is this year’s Best New International Cocktail Bar. Plus, it’s the home of Remy Savage, the 2022 International Bartender of the Year.

Lyaness at Sea Containers London clinched Best International Hotel Bar andWorld’s Best Bar. So, London, New Orleans, and New York showed out at the 2022 Spirited Awards.

To view the finalists in each category, please click here.

US Award Categories

U.S. Bartender of the Year presented by Del Maguey: Chris Hannah (Jewel of the South, New Orleans, LA)

Best U.S. Bar Mentor presented by BarSmarts: Sean Kenyon

Best U.S. Brand Ambassador presented by Libbey: Lynn House (Heaven Hill)

Best U.S. Bar Team presented by William Grant & Sons: Katana Kitten (New York, NY)

Best U.S. Cocktail Bar presented by Absolut Vodka: Katana Kitten (New York, NY)

Best U.S. Hotel Bar presented by Grey Goose: Silver Lyan at the Riggs (Washington, DC)

Best U.S. Restaurant Bar presented by Maison Ferrand: Jewel of the South (New Orleans, LA)

Best New U.S. Cocktail Bar presented by Aviation Gin: Happy Accidents (Albuquerque, NM)

International Award Categories

International Bartender of the Year presented by Patrón Tequila: Remy Savage (🔶🟥🔵 A Bar with Shapes for a Name, London, UK)

Best International Bar Mentor presented by Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic: Lauren Mote

Best International Brand Ambassador presented by Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic: Martin Hudak (Mr. Black Spirits)

Best International Bar Team presented by House of Angostura: MAYBE SAMMY (Sydney, Australia)

Best International Cocktail Bar presented by Tequila Fortaleza: Tayēr + Elementary (London, UK)

Best International Hotel Bar presented by Perrier: Lyaness at Sea Containers London (London, UK)

Best International Restaurant Bar presented by Amaro Montenegro and Select Aperitivo: Sexy Fish (London, UK)

Best New International Cocktail Bar presented by Stranger & Sons: 🔶🟥🔵 A Bar with Shapes for a Name (London, UK)

Global Award Categories

Best New Spirit or Cocktail Ingredient presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation: Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic Italian Orange

World’s Best Cocktail Menu presented by Diageo Bar Academy: Little Red Door (Paris, France)

World’s Best Spirits Selection presented by Beam Suntory: Jack Rose Dining Saloon (Washington, DC)

Pioneer Award Presented by The Blend: Amanda Gunderson (CEO and co-founder, Another Round Another Rally)

Timeless International Award presented by Jägermeister: Harry’s New York Bar (Paris, France)

Timeless U.S. Award presented by Johnnie Walker: Bemelmans Bar at The Carlyle, A Rosewood Hotel (New York, NY)

Helen David Lifetime Achievement Award presented by William Grant & Sons: Julie Reiner (Co-founder Clover Club, Leyenda, Social Hour Cocktails, Mixtress Consulting)

World’s Best Bar presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation: Lyaness at Sea Containers London (London, UK)

Writing and Media Award Categories

Best Cocktail & Spirits Publication presented by Diageo Bar Academy: VinePair

Best Broadcast, Podcast, or Online Video Series presented by Diageo Bar Academy: The Cocktail Lovers

Best Cocktail & Spirits Writing presented by Diageo Bar Academy: “Get Real: The bar world looks beyond feel-good measures on sustainability and climate change” by Max Falkowitz for Imbibe Magazine

Best New Cocktail or Bartending Book presented by Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic: The Japanese Art of the Cocktail by Masahiro Urushido and Michael Anstendig

Best New Book on Drinks Culture, History, or Spirits presented by Diageo Bar Academy: The Oxford Companion to Spirits & Cocktails edited by David Wondrich with Noah Rothbaum

Image: Cory Fontenot

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

2022 World’s 50 Best Restaurants: 1-50

2022 World’s 50 Best Restaurants: 1-50

by David Klemt

Gourmet dish on white background

Finally, the World’s 50 Best announces the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, an impressive list of the finest places to dine across the globe.

Of course, this highly anticipated news comes on the heels of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants, 51 to 100. Last night, host Stanley Tucci and special guest co-hosts announced the winners in London.

Perhaps not too surprisingly, only three American restaurants are among this year’s top fifty. Of those three, one is in Healdsburg, California, which is the wine-producing region of Sonoma County. The other two American restaurants are in New York City, which isn’t exactly a surprise. And of those two restaurants, one, number 33 on this year’s list, is the winner of the Gin Mre Art of Hospitality Award.

Unfortunately, there are no Canadian restaurants on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2022 list. That applies to the back half of the list, numbers 51 to 100, as well.

Interestingly, the restaurant taking home the title of World’s Best Restaurant 2022 took the number two spot in 2021. Another hint: This year’s number one, by clinching the top slot, is also the Best Restaurant in Europe 2022.

So, do you think you know what restaurant is the best in the world? Scroll down to see if you’re right.

The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2022: 50 to 1

  1. Single Thread (Healdsburg, California, USA)
  2. Ikoyi (London, England)
  3. Leo (Bogotá, Colombia)
  4. Oteque (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)
  5. Belcanto (Lisbon, Portugal)
  6. Narisawa (Tokyo, Japan)
  7. Le Bernardin (New York, New York, USA)
  8. Boragó (Santiago, Chile)
  9. Quique Dacosta (Dénia, Spain)
  10. La Cime (Osaka, Japan)
  11. Schloss Schauenstein (Fürstenau, Switzerland)
  12. Sorn (Bangkok, Thailand)
  13. Jordnær (Copenhagen, Denmark)
  14. Fyn (Cape Town, South Africa)
  15. Odette (Singapore)
  16. The Clove Club (London, England)
  17. Hiša Franko (Kobarid, Slovenia)
  18. Atomix (New York, New York, USA)(Gin Mare Art of Hospitality Award 2022)
  19. Mayta (Lima, Peru)
  20. Arpège (Paris, France)
  21. Florilège (Tokyo, Japan)
  22. St. Hubertus (San Cassiano, Italy)
  23. Le Clarence (Paris, France)
  24. Hof Van Cleve (Kruishoutem, Belgium)
  25. Restaurant Tim Raue (Berlin, Germany)
  26. Frantzén (Stockholm, Sweden)
  27. The Chairman (Hong Kong)
  28. The Jane (Antwerp, Belgium)
  29. Septime (Paris, France)
  30. Mugaritz (San Sebastian, Spain)
  31. Den (Tokyo, Japan)
  32. Piazza Duomo (Alba, Italy)
  33. The Alchemist (Copenhagen, Denmark)
  34. Nobelhart & Schmutzig (Berlin, Germany)(Villa Massa Highest Climber Award 2022)
  35. Elkano (Getaria, Spain)
  36. Reale (Castel di Sangro, Italy)
  37. Don Julio (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  38. Steirereck (Vienna, Austria)
  39. Uliassi (Senigallia, Italy)(Highest New Entry Award 2022)
  40. Maido (Lima, Peru)
  41. Le Calandre (Rubano, Italy)
  42. Quintonil (Ciudad de México, México)(Estrella Damm Chef’s Choice Award: Chef Jorge Vallejo)
  43. Lido 84 (Gardone Riviera, Italy)
  44.  A Casa do Porco (São Paulo, Brazil)
  45. Asador Etxebarri (Atxondo, Spain)
  46. Pujol (Ciudad de México, México)
  47. Diverxo (Madrid, Spain)
  48. Disfrutar (Barcelona, Spain)
  49. Central (Lima, Peru)
  50. Geranium (Copenhagen, Denmark)

Image: Delightin Dee on Unsplash

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Is Your Business in a Top Time Out City?

Is Your Business in a Top Time Out City?

by David Klemt

The Bean aka Cloud Gate in Chicago

Hot off the presses, Time Out is now revealing the results of their Time Out Index 2022, an annual list identifying the world’s top cities.

The global publication, founded in the late 1960s, surveyed 20,000 “city dwellers.” Time Out focuses on cities’ restaurant, bar, nightlife, entertainment, and art scenes.

For 2020 and 2021, Time Out put emphasis on the pandemic and how cities maintained resiliency and kept communities together. In 2022, priority is given to flourishing nightlife, dining, and drinking, along with culture.

Additionally, Time Out gives weight to a city’s sustainability, safety, walkability, and affordability. To learn more about how Time Out analyzes data, click here.

Compelling Rankings

Below, you’ll find Time Out’s ranking of the best 53 cities in the world for 2022. I’ve broken the list into sections: 53 to 11, and ten to number one.

Interestingly, the 20,000 survey respondents note the dining, drinking, and nightlife of the top five cities. In fact, the nightlife scene of number three is “the world’s best.”

And city number two? Survey takers think it’s the most fun—”funnest,” according to Time Out—in the world.

Now, I know our audience is largely American and Canadian, so I’ll get to how both rank. Six cities—the usual suspects, basically—in the US are on the list. Only one American city is in the top ten, and it’s likely not the one you think. As for Canada, one city claims the 27 spot, another is number nine.

You’ll find the Canadian and American cities in bold below. Champing at the bit to see the results? Scroll down!

Time Out Cities 53 to 11

  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Hong Kong
  3. Bangkok, Thailand
  4. Istanbul, Turkey
  5. Johannesburg, South Africa
  6. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  7. Auckland, New Zealand
  8. Sydney, Australia
  9. Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  10. Singapore
  11. Accra, Ghana
  12. Los Angeles, California, USA
  13. Rome, Italy
  14. Dubai, United Arab Emirates
  15. Barcelona, Spain
  16. Miami, Florida, USA
  17. São Paulo, Brazil
  18. Dublin, Ireland
  19. Athens, Greece
  20. Manila, Philippines
  21. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  22. Paris, France
  23. Tel Aviv, Israel
  24. Mexico City, Mexico
  25. Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  26. Lisbon, Portugal
  27. Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  28. Delhi, India
  29. San Francisco, California, USA
  30. Tokyo, Japan
  31. Stockholm, Sweden
  32. Birmingham, England
  33. Buenos Aires, Argentina
  34. New York, New York, USA
  35. Lyon, France
  36. Porto, Portugal
  37. London, England
  38. Taipei, Taiwan
  39. Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  40. Mumbai, India
  41. Manchester, England
  42. Madrid, Spain
  43. Cape Town, South Africa

The Top Ten Time Out Cities

  1. Copenhagen, Denmark
  2. Montréal, Québec, Canada
  3. Berlin, Germany
  4. Marrakech, Morocco
  5. Prague, Czech Republic
  6. Amsterdam, Netherlands
  7. Glasgow, Scotland
  8. Medellín, Colombia
  9. Chicago, Illinois, USA
  10. Edinburgh, Scotland

Congratulations to the top 53 cities in the world! We expect big things from their dining, drinking, and nightlife moving forward.

Image: Christopher Alvarenga on Unsplash

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What’s Up with Meat, Poultry and Seafood?

What’s Up with Meat, Poultry and Seafood?

by David Klemt

Barbecue food plate on wooden table

We know how plant proteins are performing with consumers but what do we know about how meat, poultry, and seafood are doing?

Well, because of a recent report from Datassential, we know many consumers are “meat-limiters.” And research from the World Resources Institute shows that plant-based performance is nuanced.

Interestingly, the performance of animal proteins on-premise appears to be following a beverage trend: Moderation. According to Datassential, more consumers are reducing their consumption of meat and poultry than increasing it in comparison with 2021.

So, meat-limiters may be indicative of the future of meat consumption.

Consumer Shifts

As the name implies, meat-limiters are limiting or otherwise reducing their consumption of animal proteins. Importantly, it doesn’t appear that a significant percentage of consumers are eliminating animal proteins from their diets.

Rather, many people are simply increasing the amount of plant-based items they’re eating. However, that increase is more aspirational than real in some cases.

Per Datassential’s survey of 1,500 consumers in the US, just over 70 percent of people are meat eaters. In contrast, nearly 25 percent are “flexitarian.” Just two percent are vegan or pescatarian, and only three percent are vegetarian.

So, the vast majority of Americans are still consuming meat, poultry, and seafood. We just now have reason to believe that more consumers may be leaning toward a flexitarian diet.

A bit over a quarter of consumers consume meat every day. Still, many people aspire to eat more vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, per Datassential.

However, there are more pescatarians, vegans, and vegetarians among Gen Z than the overall population. According to Datassential, this could indicate a shift away from animal proteins in the future.

Meat Performance is Nuanced

Just like plant-based performance, meat performance is nuanced. There are many factors at play.

Shifts in what consumers value are driving changes to the performance of proteins. Health, sustainability, the climate, taste, and affordability have an effect on all proteins, animal and plant.

Undeniably, inflation and shaken consumer confidence are impacting protein performance. Everything, it seems, is more expensive at the moment. Generally speaking, animal proteins are pricier than plant-based items.

It makes sense, then, that some consumers are reducing their intake of animal proteins and filling that void with fruits, veggies, and legumes.

Of particular note are shifts in daily and weekly consumption of animal proteins in 2022. Meat consumption once or more per week—beef, lamb, pork, veal—is up three percent. However, there’s a ten-percent increase in consumers eating poultry once or more per week.

Interestingly, daily poultry consumption is down seven percent in comparison with 2021. Likewise, daily consumption of seafood is also down seven percent, and fewer people are consuming it less than once per week.

Plant-based is Down

Despite what some would think, meat-limiters don’t appear to be driving up plant proteins significantly.

In fact, according to Datassential, the daily consumption of plant-based proteins is down. Per the research firm, seitan, tempeh, and tofu are the experiencing the greatest drop in daily consumption.

The fact is that across generations, more consumers eat animal proteins on a daily basis than their plant-based counterparts. Gen Z, per Datassential, consumes more animal proteins on a daily basis than other generations.

So, how does it make sense that people are reducing their meat intake but plant-based isn’t seeing a sizable jump in consumption?

In part, the answer is the growing popularity of plant-forward dishes. These are items, like bowls, that offer a small amount of meat, poultry, seafood or dairy. The majority of these menu items consists of plants but are not free of animal proteins completely.

The path forward may indeed be a plant-forward menu. Of course, this is heavily reliant on a specific concept or brand. Still, it’s likely many restaurants can do well offering mixed dishes, those heavier on plant proteins than animal proteins.

Image: Peter Pham on Unsplash

Note: This article is based on information from Datassential’s “2022 Plant-Forward Opportunity” report. To access a number of free reports, sign up with Datassential today.

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2022 World’s 50 Best Restaurants: 51-100

’22 World’s 50 Best Restaurants: 51-100

by David Klemt

High-end plate of food

Just a week away from their big 2022 reveal, numbers 51 through 100 of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants is now available.

As one expects, these restaurants represent the pinnacle of dining. The 2022 list also represents a number of changes in comparison to 2021.

For example, a number of restaurants in the Middle East are among this year’s 51 to 100 rankings. Notably, these restaurants were not included on last year’s list. In fact, nearly half of the restaurants are new entries on the 51 to 100 list.

Additionally, the 2022 list represents six continents. This year, four “new” countries and a sovereign island city-state make the 51 to 100 rankings:

  • Argentina
  • China
  • Germany
  • Singapore
  • UAE

The regional breakdown is as follows:

  • Asia: 14 restaurants
  • Europe: 13 venues
  • North America: 11 concepts
  • Middle East: 2 restaurants
  • Africa: 2 concepts
  • Oceania: 1 venue
  • South America: 7 restaurants

Just six American restaurants are on the list. Three are in New York, two in San Francisco, and one is in Chicago. Disappointingly, zero Canadian restaurants are among the 51 to 100 rankings.

Restaurants one through 50 will be revealed on Monday, July 18. Numbers 51 to 100 of the World’s 50 Best Bars will be revealed Tuesday, September 27.

The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2022: 51 to 100

  1. Alcalde (Guadalajara, Jalisco, México)
  2. Sud 777 (Ciudad de México, México)
  3. D.O.M. (São Paulo, SP, Brazil)
  4. Lyle’s (London, England)
  5. Azurmendi (Larrabetzu, Biscay, Spain)
  6. La Colombe (Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa)
  7. Trèsind Studio (Dubai, UAE)
  8. Alléno Paris au Pavillon Ledoyen (Paris, France)
  9. Sazenka (Tokyo, Japan)
  10. Rosetta (Ciudad de México, México)
  11. La Grenouillère (La Madelaine-sous-Montreuil, France)
  12. Ernst (Berlin, Germany)
  13. Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare (New York, NY, USA)
  14. Fu He Hui (Shanghai, People’s Republic of China)
  15. Le Du (Bangkok, Thailand)
  16. Sühring (Bangkok, Thailand)
  17. Evvai (São Paulo, SP, Brazil)
  18. Kjolle (Barranco, Lima, Perú)
  19. Cosme (New York, NY, USA)
  20. Zén (Singapore)
  21. Mingles (Seoul, South Korea)
  22. Atelier Crenn (San Francisco, CA, USA)
  23. Kol (London, England)
  24. Blue Hill at Stone Barns (Pocantico Hills, Mount Pleasant, NY, USA)
  25. Samrub Samrub (Bangkok, Thailand)
  26. Neighborhood (Hong Kong)
  27. Table by Bruno Verjus (Paris, France)
  28. Lasai (Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil)
  29. Estela (New York, NY, USA)
  30. AM par Alexandre Mazzia (Marseille, France)
  31. Brat (London, England)
  32. Sézanne (Tokyo, Japan)
  33. El Chato (Bogotá, DC, Colombia)
  34. Gimlet at Cavendish House (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)
  35. Raan Jay Fai (Bangkok, Thailand)
  36. Mikla (Beyoğlu/İstanbul, Turkey)
  37. Orfali Bros Bistro (Dubai, UAE)
  38. Mishiguene (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  39. Máximo Bistrot (Ciudad de México, México)
  40. Wolfgat (Paternoster, Western Cape, South Africa)
  41. Oriole (Chicago, IL, USA)
  42. Indian Accent (New Delhi, Delhi, India)
  43. Hertog Jan at Botanic Sanctuary (Antwerp, Belgium)
  44. Burnt Ends (Singapore)
  45. Meta (Singapore)
  46. Maní (São Paulo, SP, Brazil)
  47. Benu, San Francisco, CA, USA)
  48. Tantris (München, Germany)
  49. Flocons de Sel (Megève, France)
  50. Wing (Hong Kong)

*Bold denotes new entry

Image: Delightin Dee on Unsplash

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

Meat-limiters Driving Change

Meat-limiters Driving Change

by David Klemt

Plant-based food bowl

You’re likely familiar with dietary terms like vegetarian, vegan, pescatarian, and even flexitarian, but what about meat-limiter?

As the name implies, a meat-limiter is a person actively choosing to reduce their meat intake. It’s also an umbrella term that includes vegan, vegetarian, pescatarian, or flexitarian diets.

Earlier this year, Datassential took a look at plant-based opportunities. Over the course of a week, 1,500 Americans ages 18 to 88 were surveyed online.

Datassential conducted their research with three partners:

  • The Culinary Institute of America
  • Food for Climate League
  • Menus of Change University Research Collaborative

The results are revealed within Datassential’s “2022 Plant-Forward Opportunity” report. To access a number of free reports, sign up with Datassential today.

Meat-limiter Guests

Just over a quarter of Americans—29 percent—are meat-limiters in some way. That number climbs to 36 percent for Gen Z, per this Datassential survey.

Of four major diets (vegetarian, vegan, pescatarian, flexitarian), vegetarian and vegan are the least common. The overall US population consists overwhelmingly of meat eaters (71 percent). Nearly a quarter, 22 percent, are flexitarian.

For Gen Z, those same numbers are 65 percent and 19 percent, respectively. Interestingly, Gen Z has more vegetarians and vegans than other generations.

But then there’s this: When it comes to the daily consumption of animal proteins, Gen Z is at the top. It’s Millennials who consume the most plant-based proteins on a daily basis.

Animal proteins are still at the top across generations. However, people are consciously reducing their meat intake and seeking plant-based alternatives.

What’s Driving Meat-limiters?

In comparison to 2021, Datassential hit on a compelling finding. A mere six percent of the US population was actively reducing meat intake last year.

That number has skyrocketed in 2022. This year, per Datassential, 21 percent of consumers can be considered meat-limiters.

Given the pandemic, it makes sense to assume this dietary change is due to personal health. However, climate change is a major driver.

Overall, 55 percent of consumers feel climate change is important. That number climbs to 71 percent for meat-limiters, 69 percent of students.

Half of consumers also feel that plant-based foods, in general, are better for the planet. Nearly half (47 percent) feel these foods are also more sustainable. Again, the number increases for meat-limiters and students (and Millennials, as well).

Interestingly, two-thirds of consumers feel traditional plant-based food items are healthier than new plant-based meat alternatives. However, a little over 60 percent of consumers find both plant-based food categories healthy.

Takeaway

Before proceeding, it’s important to recognize that a survey of just 1,500 people comes with a margin of error.

Still, the results are compelling and provide insight into today’s consumer. Among the top insights:

  • Consumers are trying more plant-based menu items.
  • Climate change and sustainability are driving consumer decisions.
  • More consumers are concerned with their health.

Per Datassential, one way to appeal to a wide range of guests is offering “mixed dishes.” These are menu items that combine animal and plant proteins. Another way forward is menuing plant-forward dishes that include a small amount of meat, poultry, fish, or dairy.

If we accept that only a tiny fraction of the US population is vegetarian or vegan, targeting flexitarians and daily meat eaters in this way makes sense.

Image: Yoav Aziz on Unsplash

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

Datassential IDs LTO Keys

Datassential Identifies Limited-time-offer Keys

by David Klemt

Double cheeseburger on sesame bun

Food and beverage market research firm Datassential turns their attention to limited-time offers in one of their latest reports.

Part of the FoodBytes series of resources, “A Look at Limited-time Offers” is a free Datassential trend report. If you have yet to do so, sign up for Datassential FoodBytes reports.

There are several ways for savvy operators to drive traffic. Loyalty programs and subscriptions are two popular modern-day solutions.

However, the LTO is tried, true, and can boost traffic, engagement, loyalty, sales, and revenue.

Of course, there are different ways to execute LTOs. There’s the recurring, anticipation-driving item: McDonald’s McRib. Then there’s the seasonal offering: Starbucks Peppermint Mocha. And the return of a popular item eliminated years prior: Taco Bell Mexican Pizza and Wendy’s Spicy Chicken Nuggets.

Some LTOs have been going strong for years, others are leveraging a sense of nostalgia. In fact, some appear to be a direct response to Internet chatter.

Which LTO?

Per Datassential, 63 percent of LTOs most recently purchased by consumers were impulse decisions. And when the firm dives into LTOs in general, they find that one product stands above the others.

The top-performing LTO food item in terms of order frequency is the burger.

Now, does that mean you have to menu an LTO burger to succeed with this type of promotion? Of course not.

A successful LTO is one that’s authentic to your brand. And, clearly, it needs to be one that interests your guests. If you’ve been reading KRG Hospitality articles for a while, you know what I’m going to say next.

But for those who are new around here, I’m going to tell you to review your consumer data. What items are performing best? What flavors are resonating with your guests?

Now, look at the industry. What flavors and items are trending? How can you leverage them—in an authentic way—into an LTO?

If a burger may not work, will a different type of sandwich do the job? How about nuggets, breakfast items, a dessert, or a beverage?

Know your brand, know your guest, know what’s bringing the heat.

How Long?

Once you know what you’re offering, the next question should be obvious. How long are you going to make it available?

Every concept is different. What works for one may not work for another. However, analyzing what others do in terms of LTO duration and frequency can help inform you.

And as it turns out, Datassential’s latest FoodBytes report addresses “LTO cadence.”

The majority of operators—43 percent—run an LTO once every one to three months. Considering the popularity of seasonal LTOs, this frequency makes sense.

Interestingly, a quarter of operators offer an LTO more than once per month. Just about as many execute one every three to six months.

Far, far less common is running an LTO once every six to 12 months. In fact, this is the approach of just seven percent of operators. A mere two percent of operators run an LTO less than once every 12 months.

Again, there’s no “right” answer here. Some operations can succeed with multiple LTOs each month, some find success rarely offering one at all.

Takeaway

Operators know their brands best. They should know their guests equally as well, or at least strive to do so. As such, an operator should have an idea of what to offer in terms of LTO food or beverage items.

And, of course, operators should data-obsessive. That’s the only real way to have an idea of what LTOs will work, how often they should run, and how frequently one should be available.

But there’s more to know. Datassential also reveals challenges that deserve serious consideration before executing any LTO:

  • Do you have time to train staff on the new item?
  • Is your staff strong when it comes to upselling?
  • Will your guests complain when the new product is no longer available?
  • Do you have to source one or more ingredients for this item?
  • Is/Are the ingredient(s) necessary readily available?

The LTO is a proven marketing and promotion tool when done well. Challenging, yes, but worth the effort.

Image: amirali mirhashemian on Unsplash

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

What Politicians Get Wrong about Us

What Politicians Get Wrong about Our Industry

by David Klemt

Restaurant and bar with exterior windows open

It still stings that the 43 senators chose to vote against replenishing the Restaurant Revitalization Fund.

The fact that four senators didn’t vote at all on S.4008 is nearly as insulting and painful.

Now, while all the “nay” votes came from Republican senators, I’m not here to bash one party in particular. Four Republicans voted “yea,” as did two Independents.

Unfortunately, given how hostile Democrats and Republicans in Congress seem to be, it’s difficult to be objective. Right now, it appears that the RRF was left to die a slow death because many—not all, of course—Republicans in power don’t want their Democrat peers to “win” at anything.

To be used as political pawns and be left out in the cold… It’s a bitter pill to swallow.

Cornerstones

Too many politicians, it seems, view restaurants and bars as they would other types of businesses. Perhaps the perceived success of national and global brands paint the picture that independent venues and small chains don’t need any help.

More disappointingly, maybe politicians, from local lawmakers to state representatives, take our business’ role for granted.

Look at the history of restaurants and bars, of hospitality. Think about the rich history of hospitality in America alone, let alone globally.

Yes, independent restaurants and bars are small businesses. But like so many small businesses in so many towns across the country, they’re so much more.

Restaurants and bars are pillars, cornerstones of the communities they serve. These are businesses that welcome people in, treat them like family. They’re there for them as they move through their lives.

People who were seemingly at odds with another routinely found common ground over a bite and a sip. More often than not, that’s still the case.

Operators and their teams give back to their communities through food drives, quietly feeding those in need, and finding other ways to give back.

And they look out for their communities.

Lifesavers

Last week, the team at a cafe in the Bronx called the Chipper Truck helped rescue a woman from an alleged hostage situation.

Permitted by her assailant to place a food order via Grubub, the victim thought quickly and sent a life-saving note with her order:

“Please call the police… don’t make it obvious.”

A staff member read the note in the “additional instructions” section of the order and called one of the owners. Nobody at the Chipper Truck knew if the situation was real but they chose to err on the side of caution.

When the alleged assailant—who was arrested and charged with a list of serious offenses—opened the door for the Grubhub order, he was met with police officers.

A Facebook post from the cafe addressing the situation read, in part, “I’ve often heard of this happening but never thought it would happen to us. Thankfully we were open and able to help her.”

It’s terrifying that this happens enough that the cafe owners hear about it “often.” But it’s telling of the role restaurants and bars play in their communities that they’ve saved multiple lives.

This is to say nothing of the restaurants and bars that have put coded safety systems in place to help patrons who find themselves in danger.

No Such Thing as “Just” a Restaurant or Bar

There isn’t a restaurant or bar out there that’s “only” a restaurant or “only” a bar.

Every one is a source for food, for socializing, for an escape from the stresses of life. Restaurants and bars are committed to service and sacrifice.

They’re pillars of their communities, the cornerstones that play important roles in our everyday lives and the special moments as well.

Perhaps our politicians, local and otherwise, need to a reminder. Restaurants and bars play crucial roles in the lives of the people politicians are supposed to represent.

Too many politicians claim to support small businesses while their actions and votes prove otherwise. Talk, as we all know, is cheap.

Restaurants are not “just” restaurants. Bars are not “just” bars. We deserve better.

Image: Scott Webb on Unsplash

by David Klemt David Klemt No Comments

Tales Announces Top Four Awards Finalists

Tales Announces Top Four Spirited Awards Finalists

by David Klemt

The number four inside a circle

It’s official: The Tales of the Cocktail Foundation announces the top four finalists in each of the 2022 Spirited Awards categories.

I don’t envy the judges who have to narrow down the top ten nominees to the top four finalists. Equally as daunting: deciding on the winner of each award in each category.

We’ll know who’s taking home each Spirited Award in just over a month. The ceremony will take place on Thursday, July 28 at the Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans. For those attending the 20th anniversary Tales of the Cocktail, the Ritz-Carlton is this year’s headquarters hotel.

Purchase Spirited Awards tickets here, and check out the digital playbill here.

See you at Tales, y’all! Cheers.

US Categories

US Bartender of the Year presented by Del Maguey

  • Josh Davis (16th Street Bar, Chicago, IL)
  • Chris Hannah (Jewel of the South, New Orleans, LA)
  • Masahiro “Masa” Urushido (Katana Kitten, New York, NY)
  • Christine Wiseman (BarLab Hospitality Group, Miami, FL)

Best US Bar Mentor presented by BarSmarts

  • Meaghan Dorman
  • Sean Kenyon
  • Nectaly Mendoza
  • Jeffrey Morgenthaler

Best US Brand Ambassador presented by Libbey Glass

  • Chris Cabrera (Bacardí USA)
  • Tad Carducci (Gruppo Montenegro)
  • Vance Henderson (Hendrick’s Gin)
  • Lynn House (Heaven Hill)

Best US Bar Team presented by William Grant & Sons

  • Half Step (Austin, TX)
  • Jewel of the South (New Orleans, LA)
  • Katana Kitten (New York, NY)
  • The Roosevelt Room (Austin, TX)

Best US Cocktail Bar presented by Absolut Vodka

  • Bar Goto (New York, NY)
  • Katana Kitten (New York, NY)
  • The Roosevelt Room (Austin, TX)
  • Thunderbolt (Los Angeles, CA)

Best US Hotel Bar presented by Grey Goose

  • Dear Irving on Hudson at the Aliz Hotel (New York, NY)
  • Hey Love at The Jupiter (Portland, OR)
  • Little Rituals at the Residence Inn/Courtyard by Marriott (Phoenix, AZ)
  • Silver Lyan at the Riggs Washington DC (Washington, DC)

Best US Restaurant Bar presented by Maison Ferrand

  • Café La Trova (Miami, FL)
  • Cleaver: Butchered Meats, Seafood & Classic Cocktails (Las Vegas, NV)
  • Jewel of the South (New Orleans, LA)
  • Kumiko (Chicago, IL)

Best New US Cocktail Bar presented by Aviation Gin

  • Double Chicken Please (New York, NY)
  • Happy Accidents (Albuquerque, NM)
  • Temple Bar (New York, NY)
  • Yacht Club (Denver, CO)

International Categories

International Bartender of the Year presented by Patrón

  • Lorenzo Antinori (ARGO / Four Seasons Hotel & Resorts, Hong Kong, China)
  • Keith Motsi (Charles H. Seoul at the Four Seasons Hotel, Seoul, South Korea)
  • Rémy Savage (🔶🟥🔵 A Bar with Shapes for a Name, London, UK)
  • Matt Whiley (RE, Sydney, Australia)

Best International Bar Mentor presented by Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic

  • Monica Berg
  • Renato “Tato” Giovannoni
  • Lauren Mote
  • Agostino Perrone

Best International Brand Ambassador presented by Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic

  • Martin Hudák (Mr. Black Spirits)
  • Daniyel Jones (House of Angostura)
  • Ricardo Nava (Bacardí Latin America)
  • Nicola Riske (The Macallan)

Best International Bar Team presented by House of Angostura

  • ALQUÍMICO (Cartagena, Colombia)
  • MAYBE SAMMY (Sydney, Australia)
  • The Clumsies (Athens, Greece)
  • Two Schmucks (Barcelona, Spain)

Best International Cocktail Bar presented by Tequila Fortaleza

  • MAYBE SAMMY (Sydney, Australia)
  • Satan’s Whiskers (London, UK)
  • Tayēr + Elementary (London, UK)
  • Two Schmucks (Barcelona, Spain)

Best International Hotel Bar presented by Perrier

  • Charles H. Seoul at the Four Seasons Hotel (Seoul, South Korea)
  • Fifty Mils at the Four Seasons Hotel (Mexico City, Mexico)
  • Lyaness at Sea Containers London (London, UK)
  • The American Bar at The Stafford London (London, UK)

Best International Restaurant Bar presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • Danico (Paris, France)
  • Le Mary Celeste (Paris, France)
  • Pujol (Mexico City, Mexico)
  • Sexy Fish (London, UK)

Best New International Cocktail Bar presented by Stranger & Sons

  • 🔶🟥🔵 A Bar with Shapes for a Name (London, UK)
  • ARGO (Hong Kong, China)
  • Schofield’s Bar (Manchester, UK)
  • SIPS (Barcelona, Spain)

Global Categories

Best New Spirit or Cocktail Ingredient presented by Tales of the Cocktail Foundation

  • Abasolo Ancestral Corn Whisky
  • Citadelle Gin Jardin d’été
  • Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic – Italian Orange
  • Nixta Licor de Elote

World’s Best Cocktail Menu presented by Diageo Bar Academy

  • Little Red Door (Paris, France)
  • Lyaness at Sea Containers London (London, UK)
  • Swift Soho (London, UK)
  • Tayēr + Elementary (London, UK)

World’s Best Spirits Selection presented by Beam Suntory

  • In-Situ Mezcaleria (Oaxaca City, Mexico)
  • Jack Rose Dining Saloon (Washington, DC)
  • Sexy Fish (London, UK)
  • Swift Soho (London, UK)

Writing and Media Categories

Best Cocktail & Spirits Publication presented by Diageo Bar Academy

  • CLASS magazine
  • Discard the Zine
  • VinePair
  • Whisky Magazine

Best Broadcast, Podcast, or Online Video Series presented by Diageo Bar Academy

  • Radio Imbibe
  • Shōshin Art Club
  • The Cocktail Lovers Podcast
  • The Speakeasy Podcast

Best Cocktail & Spirits Writing presented by Diageo Bar Academy

  • “Get Real: The bar world looks beyond feel-good measures on sustainability and climate change” by Max Falkowitz, for Imbibe Magazine
  • “Has the Coronavirus Pandemic Destroyed American Bar Culture?” by Jeffrey Morgenthaler, for Daily Beast
  • “Meet the Eco-Packaging Innovations Transforming the Drinks Industry” by Betsy Andrews, for SevenFifty Daily
  • “The Greatest Drinking Contest in History” by David Wondrich, for Daily Beast

Best New Cocktail or Bartending Book presented by Lyre’s Non-Alcoholic

  • Death & Co: Welcome Home by Alex Day, Nick Fauchald, and David Kaplan
  • The Cocktail Seminars by Brian D. Hoefling
  • The Japanese Art of the Cocktail by Masahiro Urushido and Michael Anstendig
  • The Way of the Cocktail: Japanese Traditions, Techniques, and Recipes by Julia Momosé with Emma Janzen

Best New Book on Drinks Culture, History, or Spirits presented by Diageo Bar Academy

  • Bourbon: The Story of Kentucky Whiskey by Clay Risen
  • Drunk: How We Sipped, Danced, and Stumbled Our Way to Civilization by Edward Slingerland
  • Girly Drinks: A World History of Women and Alcohol by Mallory O’Meara
  • The Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails edited by David Wondrich with Noah Rothbaum

Image: Tim Hüfner on Unsplash

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